Tag Archives: Multi-disciplinary

How legal and policy frameworks support MDSR in Jamaica

Image_map of JamaicaProfessor Affette McCaw-Binns, a Reproductive Health Epidemiologist at the University of the West Indies (Mona) and Dr Simone Spence, Director of Family Health Services at the Ministry of Health in Jamaica explain how legislation and policy strengthened the reporting of maternal deaths in Jamaica. This case study describes how the policy framework was amended to improve the reporting of maternal deaths and how other interventions implemented simultaneously together strengthen the maternal death surveillance and response (MDSR) system.

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In the early 1980s1,2, maternal deaths in Jamaica were significantly under-reported in vital registration records by as much as 75%. With over 80% of all live births occurring in public hospitals2 it was suggested that establishing a surveillance system at public hospitals could capture needed information about the number of maternal deaths in the country. Given the findings3, the government agreed to implement an active (as opposed to the pre-existing passive) surveillance system to monitor maternal deaths.

This case study will describe the approaches that the government adopted, including how the legal framework was used in support of strengthening the MDSR system and reversing under-reporting.  Continue reading

Bangladesh | the roll out of MPDSR

Maternal and perinatal death surveillance and response in Bangladesh was initiated by the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MOH&FW) to monitor the overall improvement of maternal and neonatal health. Since its inception, the MoH&FW has been implementing MPDSR in 17 districts across Bangladesh following the pilot programme in Thakurgaon district in 2010. The approval of the national MPDSR guideline has paved the way to scale up MPDSR. From July to September 2016, a number of initiatives have taken place to further MPDSR implementation across the country.

RECENT ACTIVITIES

  • The national guidelines for MPDSR have been approved by the MOH&FW. Printing is underway and the dissemination workshop will take place in October 2016.
  • Plans to scale up MPDSR countrywide by 2021 have been drafted in the results framework of the Health, Population and Nutrition Sector Development Program 2011-2016
  • The MPDSR Training of Trainers manual is under development and will be implemented to train sub-national level facilitators who in-turn will train healthcare providers from multiple disciplines at the district and upazila levels. The upazila team will then train the field-level health care providers on death notification, verbal autopsy (VA), social autopsy and facility death review. Participants will also be trained in data collection and analysis
  • A booklet on MDPSR for health and family planning workers in the field is also being developed in the local Bengali language. A draft will be complete by September 2016. The booklet is expected to be distributed to field-level health workers (health assistants, family welfare assistants, health inspectors, assistant health inspectors, family planning inspectors and sanitary inspectors) by November 2016
  • Simplified tools of MPDSR to help facilitate death notification, VA and facility death reviews, to name a few, are being prepared for dissemination to all 17 districts. Selected variables of VA have been incorporated in the District Health Information System-2 (DHIS-2)
  • A national-level meeting – led by the Director, Primary Health Care and Line Director of Maternal, Neonatal, Child and Adolescent Health of the Directorate General of Health Services – was planned in September 2016 to share experiences in maternal and perinatal death review across 14 districts
  • The national MPDSR guidelines will be shared at six divisional workshops once finalised (expected date: December 2016).
  • The UNICEF South Asian Regional Office has organised a South-to-South exchange visit for the MOH&FW Obstetric and Gynaecological Society of Bangladesh to travel to China in November 2016 to share experiences about auditing maternal near misses

To learn more about Bangladesh’s implementation of MPDSR or components of it, please read the country update from July 2016.

Browse this case study to read about how social autopsy is used as an intervention tool to prevent maternal and neonatal deaths in communities in Bangladesh. The WHO has also published a case study about social autopsy in Bangladesh.

Acknowledgements: This country update was prepared and reviewed by Dr Riad Mahmud, Health Specialist (Maternal and Neonatal Health), Health Section, UNICEF Bangladesh and Dr Animesh Biswas, National Consultant (MPDSR), Health Section, UNICEF, Bangladesh.

Developments in PNDSR in South Africa

Scale of the problem

In South Africa, perinatal deaths are defined as all stillbirths and early neonatal deaths (from live birth to seven full days after birth). While the country has accepted the definition* of reporting and recording all deaths (foetal and neonatal) weighing more than 500 grams, it is uncertain if all hospitals where deliveries take place are correctly reporting all deaths weighing less than 1000 grams, especially stillbirths. This may be influenced by a South African law that requires all defined stillbirths to have a burial and notification of death. In rural areas and busy hospitals, this may be seen as labour intensive for already overworked staff. Continue reading

The difficulties of conducting maternal death reviews in Malawi

This article uses a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis to assess the difficulties faced in conducting MDR in Malawi.

It highlights the importance of the multi-disciplinary team in promoting collaboration and in ensuring issues relating to different disciplines are addressed.

Good leadership, an emphasis on building staff capacity and ensuring the motivation of different members of the MDR committees are vital for sustainability and success.

Confidential review of maternal deaths in Kerala: a case study

This paper by Dr Paily and colleagues, describes the processes and findings from the Confidential Review of Maternal Deaths (CRMD) in Kerala, India.

The paper describes how actions and recommendations were developed based on the findings, and how the response and monitoring has conducted a pilot phase to support continuous improvements in the delivery of quality of care.

One of the key lessons learnt relates to the importance of raising awareness among administrators as a key group who can support the process of CRMDs as members of the multi-disciplinary team.

Expert opinions from around the world: The role of the multi-disciplinary team in MDSR

We asked six experts from Malaysia, Ireland, Ethiopia and India about the importance of multi-disciplinary teams in maternal death surveillance and response (MDSR) systems. Here are the insights they shared with us.

Our contributors have all worked closely with MDSR (or maternal death review also known as MDR, which is a component of MDSR) in various guises, contexts and parts of the world. We have drawn together common themes from their insights to draw out lessons learned for the successful implementation of multi-disciplinary health actor involvement in MDSR.

Continue reading