Tag Archives: Death notification

Legal and policy frameworks supporting MDSR in Latin America and the Caribbean

Synthesis of case studies from Brazil, Mexico, Jamaica, El Salvador and Colombia

Background

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO),

Taking a human-rights based approach to health, making maternal death a notifiable event in law, and supporting this with policies for maternal death review, analysis and follow-up action, creates the preconditions necessary for successful implementation [of maternal death surveillance and response (MDSR)]”1 (p.31).

While death review systems may draw from international guidance and be standardised to an extent across countries, legal regulations can vary and can support or hinder access to information, the conduct of an audit and the response to findings2. Fear of litigation, can prevent the objective review of maternal deaths3, so having legal protection in place and ensuring an anonymous environment can encourage the sharing of information and involvement of health care workers in the MDSR system3. Similar principles can also support the investigation of stillbirths and neonatal deaths 2. Continue reading

Community Notification of Maternal, Neonatal Deaths and Still Births in Maternal and Neonatal Death Review (MNDR) System: Experiences in Bangladesh

This article by Animesh Biswas and colleagues, published by Health in September 2014, presents findings from a mixed-method study examining the process, feasibility, and acceptance of community death notification in Thakurgaon district, Bangladesh. The study found that community death notification was achievable and acceptable at the district level.

Resources from the 2015 MDSR workshop in Vancouver

On 4th October 2015, an MDSR workshop took place at the FIGO World Congress  led by the World Health Organization and UNFPA in collaboration with FIGO (the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics). The workshop aimed to identify opportunities to strengthen MDSR implementation and the contribution of MDSR to Ending Preventable Maternal Mortality beyond 2015 by:

  • Providing a forum to discuss and identify the opportunities and challenges facing MDSR implementation post-2015
  • Sharing lessons from the field on selected key topics relevant to sustained MDSR implementation
  • Identifying mechanisms and activities to strengthen global collaboration in MDSR implementation.

The workshop included presentations and “marketplace” discussion sessions on five themes. Please follow links to resources available from, or associated with, these sessions.

Death notification:

Data, communication and advocacy:

  • Role of civil society in MDSR: experiences from India. Presented by Subha Sri (CommonHealth, India). Click here to read a related civil society report on maternal deaths in India from CommonHealth.
  • How to communicate the message? Role of advocacy in communicating in MDSR. Presented by Sara Bandali (E4A).
  • Data innovations and visualization: Using scorecards to measure the strength of Maternal Death Review (MDR) systems in Nigeria and inform MDSR in Sierra Leone. Hosted by Tunde Segun (E4A) and Mohamed Yilla (E4A)
  • Data innovation and communication: Experiences from India. Hosted by Ajey Bhardwaj (Federation of Obstetric and Gynaecological Societies of India). Click here to read a related article on the development of an electronic MDR system in India. 

Funding agencies:

  • The role of funding agencies in MDSR support.  Presented by USAID. 

Professional society involvement:

  • The role of professional bodies and government agencies in MDSR: The Malaysia Experience. Presented by Dr Ravichandran Jeganathan (Ministry of Health, Malaysia).
  • Professional society involvement: The UK experience. Hosted by Dr Paul Fogarty (Royal College of Obstetrics and Gynaecologists). The Royal College of Obstetrics and Gynaecologists (RCOG) works to improve women’s health care across the world. Founded in 1929, the RCOG now have over 13,500 members worldwide and works with a range of partners both in the UK and globally to improve the standard of care delivered to women, encourage the study of obstetrics and gynaecology (O&G), and advance the science and practice of O&G. Click here to read more about the Royal College of Obstetrics and Gynaecologists.

Scaling up:

  • Going to scale: experiences from Tanzania and Ethiopia (see implementation coverage for 2014 and 2015).  Hosted by Moke Magoma (E4A) and Azmach Hadush (E4A).