News and updates

Nigeria | Updates on MPDSR in Katsina, Yobe and Zamfara

The Maternal Neonatal and Child health programme (MNCH2) is a five year country led programme which aims to reduce maternal and child mortality in northern Nigeria.  The programme works across six states: Jigawa, Kaduna, Kano, Katsina, Yobe and Zamfara.

Image_Map of Nigeria_MNCH2Since 2014, MNCH2 has been supporting maternal and perinatal death surveillance and response (MPDSR) across its six states.  At secondary level facilities (which often have a high number of deliveries), maternal death review (MDR) committees have been set up to review the causes of maternal death and take action to prevent similar deaths in the future.  MNCH2 also supports State MDR Committees to mentor and monitor facility-level committees.

MNCH2’s support to MPDSR across northern Nigeria has resulted in a number of achievements. Following the country update from March 2017, which featured updates from Kaduna, Kano and Jigawa States, here are some further examples from Katsina, Yobe and Zamfara States:

Katsina State

Discussions in the State MDR Committee led to the development of a training in the use of non-pneumatic anti-shock garments for nurses and midwives working at maternity units in ten secondary health centres. Medical Directors, Medical Officers and Maternity personnel in charge of 18 secondary health facilities contributed to this development.

Twenty nurses and midwives were trained in October 2016 on the application of anti-shock garments. Within a month, these training participants trained other maternity staff from the same secondary health facilities to use anti-shock garments. To ensure that the training is cascaded to all general hospitals, the State is mentoring facility-MDR committees on a monthly basis.

Yobe State

A MPDSR Scorecard was developed in collaboration with the State-MPDSR Committee and the Yobe State Accountability Mechanism for MNCH (YoSAMM) with support from the MNCH2 programme. Data from April to December 2016 was collected from ten government general hospitals with MNCH services. The findings are available in box 1.

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The State organised a meeting in January 2017 to review the evidence from the MPDSR scorecard. The meeting was chaired by the Honourable Commissioner of Health, Dr Mohammed Bello Kawuwa and attended by the Chief Medical Directors of the ten general hospitals, and other members of the State MPDSR Steering Committee. The key issues discussed during the meeting were:

  • Facility MDR Committees irregularly meet to review maternal deaths and take actions.
    • Proposed recommendation: YoSAMM, with support from the Advocacy sub-committee, is to visit health facilities where reviews of maternal deaths are not regularly conducted as planned. Progress in this area will be discussed at the next YoSAMM quarterly meeting in June 2017.
  • Completion of MPDSR tools not meeting national standards.
    • Proposed recommendation: Health-care providers should receive a refresher training in the completion of MPDSR forms. A training was conducted in February 2017.
  • Pregnant women are reluctant to deliver at a facility.
    • Proposed recommendation: Local government health promotion officers should conduct community mobilisation activities on the importance of antenatal care (ANC) visits and delivery by a skilled birth attendant.

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Zamfara State

MDR findings from a secondary facility led to the identification of a number of medical equipment and infrastructure features that were lacking. In response to this, the facility MDR committee called on the local government to build an ultrasound centre and provide ultrasound machines. The facility received these provisions in June 2016. Community MPDSR findings led to further action from the local government in the provision of a renovated labour room, a newly built ANC waiting room with a capacity of 250, and ten beds for the maternity ward.

Acknowledgements: This update was prepared based on feedback from:

  • Mohammad Anka – Evidence and Advocacy coordinator, MNCH2 Zamfara state office
  • Garba Haruna Idris – Evidence and Advocacy coordinator,MNCH2 Katsina state office
  • Musa Mohammad- Evidence and Advocacy coordinator, MNCH2 Yobe state office.

Nigeria | MPDSR scorecard from Lagos State

In Nigeria, the Evidence for Action (E4A)-MamaYe programme has continued to provide extensive support to the iImage_Cover of scorecardmplementation of maternal and perinatal death surveillance and response (MPDSR) at sub-national levels from October to December 2016.

The programme assisted the Lagos State MPDSR Committee and the Lagos State Accountability Mechanism for maternal, newborn and child health (LASAM) to develop the State-level Facility MPDSR Scorecard. Data from May to July, 2016 from 17 general hospitals with MNCH services were submitted and presented in the scorecard (see excerpt, below). Continue reading

State-level updates in northern Nigeria

The Maternal Neonatal and Child health programme (MNCH2) is a five year country led programme which aims to reduce maternal and child mortality in northern Nigeria.  The programme works across six states: Jigawa, Kaduna, Kano, Katsina, Yobe and Zamfara.

Image_Map of Nigeria_MNCH2Since 2014, MNCH2 has been supporting maternal and perinatal death surveillance and response (MPDSR) across its six states.  At secondary level facilities (which often have a high number of deliveries), MDR committees have been set up to review the causes of maternal death and take action to prevent similar deaths in the future.  MNCH2 also supports State MDR Committees to mentor and monitor facility-level committees.  MNCH2’s support to MPDSR across northern Nigeria has resulted in a number of achievements. Here are some examples: Continue reading

Ethiopia MDSR Resource Hub

Image_Ethiopia Quarterly MDSR newsletters_Banner_PostVisit the new Ethiopia MDSR Resource Hub on the Action Network website!

Read what the Minister of Health thinks about the power of MDSR. Watch a short film of how MDSR is saving lives in Ethiopia. Browse the first National Report on MDSR data; download the policy briefs on quality of care and strengthening maternal death surveillance; and much more!

The Global Financing Facility: A Brief Overview

Are you familiar with the Global Financing Facility (GFF)? Do you live in one of the 63 countries receiving or eligible to receive GFF funding?

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The GFF was launched by the UN and the World Bank in July last year to improve the health of women, children and adolescents. It is a financing model that combines domestic funding with external resources.

While the GFF is still in its early days, we believe that it has the potential to improve MDSR systems, through investing in civil registration and vital statistics (CRVS) systems, for example. An important focus of the GFF is to improve CRVS systems – a key method for measuring improvements in maternal and newborn health – to capture information on births, deaths and causes of deaths. Continue reading

Seminar Series: 2017

Innovations in maternal and perinatal health in humanitarian settings: Exploring evidence and innovations to improve maternal and newborn survival among populations affected by humanitarian crises 

This new seminar series will take place at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) in collaboration with the Global MDSR Action Network and LSHTM’s Health in Humanitarian Crises Centre and The Centre for Maternal, Adolescent, Reproductive, and Child Health (MARCH). Continue reading

Three new tools from the World Health Organization

On 16 August, 2016 the World Health Organization (WHO) launched three new tools to count and review stillbirths, and maternal and neonatal deaths!

Browse the standardised system to capture and classify stillbirths and neonatal deaths in the WHO Application of the International Classification of Disease-10 to deaths during the perinatal period (ICD-PM).

Read the guide and toolkit, Making every baby count: audit and review of stillbirths and neonatal deaths. This publication assists countries to conduct audits and reviews to recommend and put into action solutions to prevent future stillbirths and neonatal deaths.

Explore Time to respond: a report on the global implementation of maternal death surveillance and response to review the findings of the WHO & UNFPA global survey of national MDSR systems in 2015.

Also…

Browse the press release and WHO website to learn more about these three tools, including related papers by the BJOG.

Read this Lancet commentary about all three publications.

Explore this photo story to learn more about MDSR implementation in ten countries around the world.

View this infographic about improving data to learn about what the WHO is doing to help countries save mothers’ and babies’ lives.

Do you know how many women each day experience a stillbirth worldwide? Browse this infographic on the tragedy of stillbirths to find out how many, and more!

News updates: Global Financing Facility

Global Financing Facility (GFF): the Country Powered Investments report supporting Every Woman, Every Child, was launched 20 September. Four new countries – Guatemala, Guinea, Myanmar and Sierra Leone – have also recently become eligible to access GFF funding. For more information about the GFF, visit the website here.

 

 

The Lancet Maternal Health Series

On 18 September, The Lancet launched the 2016 maternal health series in New York City on the opening day of the United Nations’ General Assembly, following a decade since the maternal survival Series was published. The new Series comprises of six papers discussing the diversity and divergence of poor maternal health, the extremes of maternal care (too little, too late and too soon, too much), childbirth care, women centred care in high-income countries, future external factors and health-system innovations, and a call to action to presenting five key targets to ensure that the Sustainable Development Goals are met.

Tanzania | Scaling up MPDSR implementation with new guidelines

Maternal and perinatal death surveillance and response is recognised by the Tanzanian government as a process for improving quality of maternal and newborn care in health facilities. With a stepwise approach and the decision to initially focus on facility-based maternal and perinatal deaths before scaling up to include deaths occurring at the community level, new guidelines were developed and are being rolled out to all 26 regions in mainland Tanzania. The process is supported by the WHO country office and involves the training of trainers in each region so that implementation is tailored to the local settings rather than a centralised initiative led by the Ministry of Health (MoH).

Support from the WHO has complemented previous efforts by health stakeholders to roll out of the new national guidelines in four regions in the Lake and Southern zones. Funding from the WHO helped quicken the roll-out process across the country, especially in regions previously not supported.

Led by the MoH, national experts were invited to participate in drafting the timeframe of the countrywide roll-out. Three teams of at least three experts each helped disseminate the new guidelines and trained at least 20 trainers in each region to take over the dissemination and training in districts and health facilities.

In contrast to the 2006-2015 maternal and perinatal death review guidelines, the MPDSR guidelines focus on strengthening skills in maternal and perinatal death audits at the facility level – including the use of information to improve service delivery – and improving capacities to oversee and support implementation at the district, regional and national levels. The MPDSR guidelines define the differences between audit committees at the facility level and technical teams at the district, regional and national levels. They also clarify the use of generated data to inform service delivery and MPDSR implementation at all levels. Reporting from facility to national levels and developing feedback loops are also highlighted in the guidelines to ensure a common understanding. Additionally, the use of information and communications technology, such as WhatsApp groups, to link MPDSR trainers to health facilities in each district and region is also encouraged and are already used to share progress in developing skills that are impactful at all levels.

The MPDSR guidelines are expected to be disseminated to all regions by September 2016 as the scale up of MPDSR in Tanzania progresses.

  • To read the country update for Tanzania from July 2016, please click here.
  • To learn more about MPDSR implementation in Tanzania, read this case study published by the World Health Organization.
  • Read this paper, published by the Tropical Medicine and International Health journal in 2014, to learn about the strengths and weaknesses in implementing MPDRs in Tanzania.

 Acknowledgements: This update was written by Dr Moke Magoma, Team Leader QI, TGPSH (Tanzanian German Programme to Support Health).