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Report on perinatal deaths in South Africa

In late 2016, two reports reflecting perinatal population statistics were released in South Africa: April newsletter_Evidence summary_image 1Perinatal Deaths in South Africa, 2014, which is
the second annual report by Statistics South Africa (the government department mandated to produce statistical information) and the fifth Rapid Mortality Surveillance Report, 2015 by the Burden of Disease Research Unit of the South African Medical Research Council. These reports provide the most recent national picture of the trends and causes of death of the perinatal population.

This summary, written by Dr Natasha R Rhoda, Senior Neonatal Consultant at Groote Schuur Hospital in Cape Town and the chairperson of the National Perinatal Mortality and Morbidity Committee in South Africa, concentrates on the most recent data for the period 2012 to 2014 and will summarise the findings of the Perinatal Deaths in South Africa, 2014 report. Continue reading

Seminar 2: Applying maternal death surveillance and response in crises settings

Watch the live recording of the event here!

Event information

Date and Time: Thursday 23rd March 2017, 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm, followed by refreshments

Location: John Snow Lecture Theatre, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), Keppel Street, London, WC1E 7HT, UK

LSHTM & MDSR AN Seminar 2_event advert_imageOverview:

Mothers and their babies face greater risks to their survival during humanitarian crises. However, there is a dearth of evidence about how best to apply reproductive health interventions effectively in crises settings. Understanding why women and their babies die in these specific circumstances is pivotal to designing appropriate interventions to prevent deaths from similar causes.

This seminar will explore tools and approaches to maternal death surveillance and response (MDSR) in crises settings with presentations on the following:

  • Value of MDSR data and systems in crises settings, and in contributing to achieving  sexual and reproductive health rights
  • Approaches to measuring maternal mortality in refugee settings and responding to findings
  • Participatory ethnographic evaluation research (PEER) as a tool to triangulate MDSR findings in crises settings

Speakers:

  • Rajat Khosla, Human Rights Adviser – Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights, World Health Organization, Geneva
  • Nadine Cornier, Humanitarian Adviser – Reproductive Health & Head of Office, UNFPA, Turkey
  • Eleanor Brown, Technical Specialist – Options, London

Moderator: Sarah Moxon, Research Fellow, the March Centre for Maternal, Adolescent, Reproductive and Child Health, LSHTM

This event is a collaboration between the Health in Humanitarian Crises Centre, the Global MDSR Action Network and the MARCH Centre for Maternal, Adolescent, Reproductive and Child Health

Admission and registration: It is free to attend this seminar, but registration is required. Registration is now closed.

To learn more about the seminar series, Innovations in Maternal and Perinatal Health in Humanitarian Settings: Exploring Evidence and Innovations to Improve Maternal and Newborn Survival among Populations Affected by Humanitarian Crises, click here.

Email: mdsr@evidence4action.net

Twitter: @E4AMamaYeAfrica #MDSR

The live stream recording is available here.

Watch this space for additional recordings of the event and access to supplementary materials.


Read more about the seminar series here.

Find out more about the first seminar of the series: Innovations to improve maternal and newborn death surveillance to respond to future Ebola outbreaks here.

How legal and policy frameworks support MDSR in Jamaica

Image_map of JamaicaProfessor Affette McCaw-Binns, a Reproductive Health Epidemiologist at the University of the West Indies (Mona) and Dr Simone Spence, Director of Family Health Services at the Ministry of Health in Jamaica explain how legislation and policy strengthened the reporting of maternal deaths in Jamaica. This case study describes how the policy framework was amended to improve the reporting of maternal deaths and how other interventions implemented simultaneously together strengthen the maternal death surveillance and response (MDSR) system.

BackgroundImage_Dr Simone Spence_thumbnailImage_Prof Affette McCaw-Binns_Thumbnail

In the early 1980s1,2, maternal deaths in Jamaica were significantly under-reported in vital registration records by as much as 75%. With over 80% of all live births occurring in public hospitals2 it was suggested that establishing a surveillance system at public hospitals could capture needed information about the number of maternal deaths in the country. Given the findings3, the government agreed to implement an active (as opposed to the pre-existing passive) surveillance system to monitor maternal deaths.

This case study will describe the approaches that the government adopted, including how the legal framework was used in support of strengthening the MDSR system and reversing under-reporting.  Continue reading

Nigeria | MPDSR scorecard from Lagos State

In Nigeria, the Evidence for Action (E4A)-MamaYe programme has continued to provide extensive support to the iImage_Cover of scorecardmplementation of maternal and perinatal death surveillance and response (MPDSR) at sub-national levels from October to December 2016.

The programme assisted the Lagos State MPDSR Committee and the Lagos State Accountability Mechanism for maternal, newborn and child health (LASAM) to develop the State-level Facility MPDSR Scorecard. Data from May to July, 2016 from 17 general hospitals with MNCH services were submitted and presented in the scorecard (see excerpt, below). Continue reading

The power of communities: strengthening maternal death reporting…and much more!

  • Doubling the number of maternal deaths identified.
  • Accurate and cost-efficient method of measuring the maternal mortality ratio.
  • Strengthened relationships and trust between health facilities and communities they serve.
  • Community actions to prevent future deaths: establishing mobile antenatal care clinics, arranging community meetings to explore traditional beliefs and mobilising funds for bicycle ambulances.

9931220574_d3c293d629_cThese are some of the key results from a community-linked maternal death review (CLMDR) pilot that ran from 2011-2012 in Mchinji district, Malawi.  Presented by Dr Tim Colbourn, Lecturer in Global Health Epidemiology and Evaluation at the University College London (UCL) Institute for Global Heath, the results of the study show the importance of involving communities in the process of identifying maternal death and acting on the recommendations of maternal death review and surveillance (MDSR) systems. Continue reading

Ethiopia MDSR Resource Hub

Image_Ethiopia Quarterly MDSR newsletters_Banner_PostVisit the new Ethiopia MDSR Resource Hub on the Action Network website!

Read what the Minister of Health thinks about the power of MDSR. Watch a short film of how MDSR is saving lives in Ethiopia. Browse the first National Report on MDSR data; download the policy briefs on quality of care and strengthening maternal death surveillance; and much more!

Seminar Series: 2017

Innovations in maternal and perinatal health in humanitarian settings: Exploring evidence and innovations to improve maternal and newborn survival among populations affected by humanitarian crises 

This new seminar series will take place at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) in collaboration with the Global MDSR Action Network and LSHTM’s Health in Humanitarian Crises Centre and The Centre for Maternal, Adolescent, Reproductive, and Child Health (MARCH). Continue reading

Developments in PNDSR in South Africa

Scale of the problem

In South Africa, perinatal deaths are defined as all stillbirths and early neonatal deaths (from live birth to seven full days after birth). While the country has accepted the definition* of reporting and recording all deaths (foetal and neonatal) weighing more than 500 grams, it is uncertain if all hospitals where deliveries take place are correctly reporting all deaths weighing less than 1000 grams, especially stillbirths. This may be influenced by a South African law that requires all defined stillbirths to have a burial and notification of death. In rural areas and busy hospitals, this may be seen as labour intensive for already overworked staff. Continue reading

Perinatal death surveillance and response to improve survival of babies

The mortality audit (or review) process is an established tool to assess the events around a death. Applying an audit cycle can highlight breakdowns from local to national levels and ultimately improve civil registration and vital statistic (CRVS) systems and quality of care. Maternal death surveillance and response (MDSR) is a form of this strategy that has been used by many countries[1].

Less information, however, has been captured and assessed on stillbirths and neonatal deaths[2]. In 2014, 51 priority countries reported having a policy on maternal death notification, and only 17 countries had a policy for reporting and reviewing stillbirths and neonatal deaths[3].

Continue reading

Expert opinions from around the world: The role of the multi-disciplinary team in MDSR

We asked six experts from Malaysia, Ireland, Ethiopia and India about the importance of multi-disciplinary teams in maternal death surveillance and response (MDSR) systems. Here are the insights they shared with us.

Our contributors have all worked closely with MDSR (or maternal death review also known as MDR, which is a component of MDSR) in various guises, contexts and parts of the world. We have drawn together common themes from their insights to draw out lessons learned for the successful implementation of multi-disciplinary health actor involvement in MDSR.

Continue reading