Tanzania | Scaling up MPDSR implementation with new guidelines

Maternal and perinatal death surveillance and response is recognised by the Tanzanian government as a process for improving quality of maternal and newborn care in health facilities. With a stepwise approach and the decision to initially focus on facility-based maternal and perinatal deaths before scaling up to include deaths occurring at the community level, new guidelines were developed and are being rolled out to all 26 regions in mainland Tanzania. The process is supported by the WHO country office and involves the training of trainers in each region so that implementation is tailored to the local settings rather than a centralised initiative led by the Ministry of Health (MoH).

Support from the WHO has complemented previous efforts by health stakeholders to roll out of the new national guidelines in four regions in the Lake and Southern zones. Funding from the WHO helped quicken the roll-out process across the country, especially in regions previously not supported.

Led by the MoH, national experts were invited to participate in drafting the timeframe of the countrywide roll-out. Three teams of at least three experts each helped disseminate the new guidelines and trained at least 20 trainers in each region to take over the dissemination and training in districts and health facilities.

In contrast to the 2006-2015 maternal and perinatal death review guidelines, the MPDSR guidelines focus on strengthening skills in maternal and perinatal death audits at the facility level – including the use of information to improve service delivery – and improving capacities to oversee and support implementation at the district, regional and national levels. The MPDSR guidelines define the differences between audit committees at the facility level and technical teams at the district, regional and national levels. They also clarify the use of generated data to inform service delivery and MPDSR implementation at all levels. Reporting from facility to national levels and developing feedback loops are also highlighted in the guidelines to ensure a common understanding. Additionally, the use of information and communications technology, such as WhatsApp groups, to link MPDSR trainers to health facilities in each district and region is also encouraged and are already used to share progress in developing skills that are impactful at all levels.

The MPDSR guidelines are expected to be disseminated to all regions by September 2016 as the scale up of MPDSR in Tanzania progresses.

  • To read the country update for Tanzania from July 2016, please click here.
  • To learn more about MPDSR implementation in Tanzania, read this case study published by the World Health Organization.
  • Read this paper, published by the Tropical Medicine and International Health journal in 2014, to learn about the strengths and weaknesses in implementing MPDRs in Tanzania.

 Acknowledgements: This update was written by Dr Moke Magoma, Team Leader QI, TGPSH (Tanzanian German Programme to Support Health).