Tag Archives: legal and policy frameworks

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Legal and policy frameworks that support MDSR: Series

According to the World Health Organization (WHO):

“Taking a human-rights based approach to health, making maternal death a notifiable event in law, and supporting this with policies for maternal death review, analysis and follow-up action, creates the preconditions necessary for successful implementation [of maternal death surveillance and response (MDSR)]”¹ (p.31).

While death review systems may draw from international guidance and be standardised to an extent across countries, legal regulations can vary and can support or hinder access to information, the conduct of an audit and the response to findings². Fear of litigation, can prevent the objective review of maternal deaths³, so having legal protection in place and ensuring an anonymous environment can encourage the sharing of information and involvement of health care workers in the MDSR system³. Similar principles can also support the investigation of stillbirths and neonatal deaths².

To gain a better understanding of how legal and policy frameworks support the successful implementation of MDSR, we developed a three-part series, publishing:

References

¹ World Health Organization. (2016). Time to respond: a report on the global implementation of maternal death surveillance and response. Geneva: WHO.

² World Health Organization. (2016). Making every baby count: audit and review of stillbirths and neonatal deaths. Geneva: WHO

³ World Health Organization. (2013). Maternal death surveillance and response: technical guidance. Information for action to prevent maternal death. Geneva: WHO.

Legal and policy frameworks supporting MDSR in Latin America and the Caribbean

Synthesis of case studies from Brazil, Mexico, Jamaica, El Salvador and Colombia

Background

According to the World Health Organisation (WHO),

Taking a human-rights based approach to health, making maternal death a notifiable event in law, and supporting this with policies for maternal death review, analysis and follow-up action, creates the preconditions necessary for successful implementation [of maternal death surveillance and response (MDSR)]”1 (p.31).

While death review systems may draw from international guidance and be standardised to an extent across countries, legal regulations can vary and can support or hinder access to information, the conduct of an audit and the response to findings2. Fear of litigation, can prevent the objective review of maternal deaths3, so having legal protection in place and ensuring an anonymous environment can encourage the sharing of information and involvement of health care workers in the MDSR system3. Similar principles can also support the investigation of stillbirths and neonatal deaths 2. Continue reading

How legal and policy frameworks support MDSR in Jamaica

Image_map of JamaicaProfessor Affette McCaw-Binns, a Reproductive Health Epidemiologist at the University of the West Indies (Mona) and Dr Simone Spence, Director of Family Health Services at the Ministry of Health in Jamaica explain how legislation and policy strengthened the reporting of maternal deaths in Jamaica. This case study describes how the policy framework was amended to improve the reporting of maternal deaths and how other interventions implemented simultaneously together strengthen the maternal death surveillance and response (MDSR) system. Continue reading